FAQ

1. What can an agency do for me?
2. What are the benefits of working with an agency?
3. Can’t I do all this myself?
4. How do you go about an agency search?
5. What can I do to get the best advertising from my agency?
6. How do I evaluate results?
7. How do I determine a budget?
8. Who is Fred Riger?
9. Who is Riger Advertising these days?
10. What is Riger’s definition of “Effective?”
11. What makes Riger tick?
12. How is my account team structured?
13. How do you charge for your services?
14. Where do I start?

 

1. What can an agency do for me?

Provide all the services necessary to manage your total advertising and marketing program. Depending on your business’s goals, present needs and capabilities, this can include:
– Analyzing your problems and opportunities
– Recommending effective marketing directions and solutions
– Preparing an appropriate and creative message
– Ensuring maximum efficiency in the planning and buying of the right media in which to communicate your message

 

2. What are the benefits of working with an agency?

– Flexibility as an “as-needed” resource you “turn on” when you need it and “turn off” when you don’t
-An extension of your own marketing department, or in some cases it effectively becomes the marketing department
– Smart, innovative people
– The ability to turn strategic, creative ideas into persuasive marketing communications
– An objective, third-party perspective free of internal politics and bias
– Insights gained from experience with the way people research and buy products
– “Cross-pollination” of ideas—benefit from the agency’s experience
– Knowledge of the different media outlets and how to get the best return-on-investment (ROI) for your advertising dollar
– An integrated, 360-degree (“holistic”) approach to marketing
– Accountability—competition ensures you get their very best.

 

3. Can’t I do all this myself?

It’s really a question of evaluating what you do best and what an agency does best. After looking at core competencies, many businesses decide that it’s wisest and most cost effective to form a relationship with a good agency.

 

4. How do you go about an agency search?

The first step is to decide what it is you hope to accomplish with the agency. Clearly stating your objectives in writing is a good way to bring focus to your thinking. And, it creates a “scorecard” on which you may wish to evaluate prospective agencies.

 

5. What can I do to get the best advertising from my agency?

– Set high standards
– Set goals based on a broad internal understanding of what your marketing is designed to accomplish
– Communicate, communicate, communicate
– Have as few approval levels as possible
– Recognize when you work as a team with your agency, your agency will like to work with you—and it will show in your advertising
– Have highly skilled people on your side of the table

 

6. How do I evaluate results?

Advertising effectiveness can be measured using quantitative and/or qualitative techniques. Determine what you are trying to measure. Then analyze the number and types of leads you’re getting from your ad program. Or, “take the market’s temperature” using brand awareness surveys to evaluate your brand recognition. Anecdotal evidence is another way to measure success. Are your salespeople finding that their reputation precedes them? Do customers know your company and what product they are selling before they arrive on their doorstep? If so, your advertising is probably hitting the target.

One of an agency’s roles is to help you form realistic and appropriate measures of effectiveness. In online advertising, click-throughs can be one way of measuring effectiveness, but it is only one way. Companies as large as P&G now look at not just click-throughs, but at branding and the power of online and social media to help make or break a company’s image.

By helping to bring a proper perspective to your marketing strategies, means and goals, Riger will work with you to formulate truly useful measures of effectiveness and marketing success.

 

7. How do I determine a budget?

Historical spending is one way to set an ad budget, but not the best. Percent-of-sales is another approach, but should be guided by factors like company size and product stage (maturity). Another method—the one we usually advocate—is the “task to be accomplished” approach whereby a list of goals drives a list of strategies, which in turn drives a list of tactics or tasks. Each task is then assigned a cost and the sum is a budget.

Consult your industry’s trade association for guidelines, or ask us. Through the American Association of Advertising Agencies (AAAA), we can track down the historical spending levels of businesses in just about any industry.

 

8. Who is Fred Riger?

Founder. Leader. Mentor. Friend.

Fredrick R. Riger (1915–1994) performed all of these roles during his long and distinguished career as president of Fred Riger Advertising Agency, Inc. A battle-tested bomber pilot who flew dozens of combat missions during WWII, Fred left a good public relations job in New York City in 1950 to return to his home town and undertake the sizable challenge of starting his own advertising agency. Together with his wife Martha, who served as the agency’s office manager/bookkeeper, he met that challenge daily for the next 34 years, until his retirement in 1984. Along the way, he displayed a unique blend of optimism, realism, creativity, and discipline that set the standard for his colleagues to attempt to emulate. That standard is Fred’s legacy, and while the nature of our business seems to change on a daily basis, his guiding principles remain at the heart of everything we do on behalf of our clients.

 

9. Who is Riger these days?

– Proactive and Responsive–Ears that anticipate and listen.
– Creative–A head and heart for good advertising. Riger clients have access to our full palette, poised to produce award-winning creative in any media.
– Effective–An ever watchful eye on results. Each day is a fresh opportunity to produce work that produces success for our clients.

 

10. What is Riger’s definition of “Effective?”

Effective work is work that makes things happen. It does more than get noticed; it makes the market say “Wow!” It does more than create awareness, interest, conviction and action; it builds a brand of distinction. It does more than persuade; it sells.

 

11. What makes Riger tick?

Our people. Let’s just say Riger is a tightly knit bunch of loosely wound advertising professionals working side-by-side for the betterment of our clients’ businesses and the improvement of our lots in life…one project at a time…one day at a time.

We simply give you our very best. It’s all about creating professional, effective marketing by knowing our clients’ business and by being the most Proactive, Creative and Effective team we can be on their behalf. It—The Work—is not just what we do each day. It defines who we are.

 

12. How is my account team structured?

We surround each project with a multidisciplinary team consisting of just enough people to get the job done.

We also recognize there are times when we won’t have every resource under our roof. That’s when we bring in the hired guns. With over 60 years of experience and literally hundreds of contacts in the business, our network of talented freelancers, photographers, programmers, etc., is a real resource to our clients. Whether we act as your general contractor, or simply provide a quality referral, your needs drive the mix.

 

13. How do you charge for your services?

Actual compensation methods vary depending on your needs.
-On a project basis—specific work for a set price.
-Fee-for-service—payment on an hourly basis for agency services. As more and more of the agency’s services (e.g, online reputation monitoring, public relations, or media analysis/planning/buying) come into play, the nature of our relationship often grows.
-Letter of agreement—spells out all the terms of the longer-term relationship. This agreement may include a monthly retainer fee. The benefit of this arrangement is much like that of having a utility’s budget plan: you know exactly how much is budgeted each month for those services.

At the end of the day, whether we’re compensated on a project, or hourly basis, through media commissions or through a retainer, the acid test is simple: if you feel you got what you paid for, the compensation arrangement is working.

 

14. Where do I start?

Ask us: call or go to Get a Quote.